There has been no further word today (Wednesday) on any progress on talks between Major League Baseball (MLB) and the Player's Association.  Discussions yesterday ended with what appears to be no real progress. Originally two major roadblocks appeared to be issues between the two sides.  Health and safety stand at the top of the list but money and player salaries now look like the major force dividing the two.

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Various sources report the major disagreement is compensation for players.  In an email published in the Wednesday edition of the New York Post it appears to open the door for the owners to renegotiate salary amounts for players if games were to be played with no fans in attendance.  Player's Association representatives interpret wording in the meetings held on March 26 to mean that salaries would be pro-rated on a games- played basis.  MLB representatives believe that they have the right to change that to revenue sharing if games end up being played with no fans in attendance.  The owners contend that losing revenue with no fans buying tickets, concessions and souvenirs changes the money situation considerably.

Meanwhile the sound of the clock ticking is getting louder.  MLB has hopes of getting an abbreviated season underway in time for the July 4 holiday.  Both sides appear to agree that a two to three week training period must take place before there can be any regular season games played. Meanwhile, fans just wait, hopeful that their favorite team will take the field sometime soon. If the season goes down the drain totally and money becomes the prime reason, the millions of fans who have lost jobs or businesses will have little sympathy.